Good news for Joe Biden

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While the infrastructure deal forges ahead, the biggest question is how much public support it has – the main reason for Congress to keep carrying forward, and for the president to push them on it. There’s always a good ratings cash grab story here and there about how someone could be dooming the legislation at the last minute, but considering how much money donors make from infrastructure projects, it should be seen for the bluster it typically is.

The more important story here is whether or not the Democrats have momentum when it comes to voters who want to see improved roads and improved transportation and internet access. In the first few months before voting began on the bill, Republicans were trying to warn voters off with the price tag – a strategy that backfired so poorly, the infrastructure proposal became more popular when voters learned how much it would cost.

Now, President Biden and the Democrats have some more good news, coming as the bill enters debate – a surge in popularity according to a poll from Monmouth University. Rather than simply asking about job approval or favorability ratings as scientific polls often do, the Monmouth poll also asked voters whether or not they saw the current administration’s policies as benefiting the middle class. When asked a month ago, just 51% answered yes. For July, that number jumped 11 points – with two-thirds of respondents saying that the Biden administration’s policies have significantly improved the lives of poor families.

   

62% is also the number of Americans who supported the American Rescue Plan, which passed through Congress with no support from Republicans – and which Americans are continuing to feel the benefits of. This is only one poll but the size of the jump suggests Democratic messaging is working, while the GOP is struggling to keep a coherent message. There’s no crystal ball to say for sure what 2022 will be like – but this is one of those good signs to look out for, and a good incentive to turn out as many voters as possible.

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