DOJ makes big move against Peter Navarro, and it points to more trouble for Donald Trump

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As big as it is that Alex Jones accidentally coughed up all his January 6th text messages, the news of the DOJ attempting to obtain Peter Navarro’s Trump White House communications could prove to be an even bigger story. Navarro has been indicted for contempt, but it’s becoming clear that the DOJ is trying to use him to get to bigger fish, including Donald Trump himself.

The DOJ has already reportedly offered Navarro a plea deal (one contempt charge instead of the current two) but Navarro refused. Now the DOJ is seeking records that could further incriminate him, in an apparent effort to further pressure him to cut a deal.

Navarro has to consider that if the DOJ succeeds in obtaining his emails, he’ll have less leverage in any leniency deal negotiations. The DOJ doesn’t need his testimony as badly if it has the incriminating emails against him and Trump world. Navarro should consider flipping soon – particularly considering that Jones suddenly has new motivation to consider cutting a deal. The first person who cuts a deal generally gets the most leniency.

It’s not clear why the DOJ seems intent on squeezing Navarro into flipping, but doesn’t appear to have offered Bannon a deal. Perhaps it views Navarro as weaker and thus easier to pressure into flipping. Or maybe it doesn’t believe Bannon would make good on a cooperation deal.


In any case it’s also being reported that Navarro offered to give the DOJ his Trump White House communications voluntarily, but only in exchange for full immunity, and the DOJ turned him down. This suggests the DOJ now has enough evidence that it doesn’t have to hand out outright immunity in exchange for cooperation. Navarro, and others, are likely running out of time to cut a deal that would involve minimal prison time. At some point time is up, and everyone who hasn’t flipped is looking at doing a full prison sentence.

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