Portrait of a comeback

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When the former guy took office, many norms were shattered. We, the American people, watched things we had always taken for granted undergo drastic changes. And some of those changes we were helpless to stop. One of those things has to do with Presidential portraits.

The former guy who hates just about every politician who is not him refused to allow portraits of former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush to stay on display. So they were taken down.

The former guy also despicably refused to hold the ceremony for the unveiling of the portrait of President Barack Obama. This shattered yet another norm that had been in place for 40 years.

But in yet another great move, President Biden is cleaning up the former guy’s mess.

Biden has already had the portraits of Bush and Clinton restored to their former rightful place in the Grand Foyer.

And now President Biden has also announced that he will host a White House ceremony later this year. This ceremony will be for the unveiling of President Obama’s portrait.

An official date has not yet been announced, but the ceremony will most likely take place after all the COVID restrictions have been lifted, making it possible to have quite a large gathering.

The former guy’s motivations were of coarse envy and hatred, particularly in the case of Obama. Former President Obama is everything the former guy would like to be and isn’t.


It is good to see President Biden clean up yet mess left behind from the horrible days of the big orange. It is also good to see a wrong righted and a norm that was shattered by hatred returned with love and humility by a President who is shaping up to go down in history as one of our bests.

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