This is not what Donald Trump wanted to hear from the Fulton County special grand jury

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She would go to her car and cry. I am referring to one of the jurors in the Georgia case against Donald Trump. This is a Jury’s story. Several jurors have spoken out to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. And some of what they said moved ME to tears.

“One of the most important things we’ll be a part of in our life was this eight-month process.” It is sometimes easy to forget that these people — these jurors are human beings. They’ve been turned into numbers — Juror number one or two. The fact is they’re just like us. The same sunsets move them, the same things inspire them. They see the beauty of the world around them the same as we do. And just like you and me, they also see depravity.

They must have seen much of it in this case. “Took it very seriously.” They were not allowed to talk to others about the horrors they had heard about. In a way, they were in exile — having nobody but each other, mutual companions and judges in something that could have come out of a dystopian novel.

They heard about that third phone call that we knew nothing about. They heard so many secrets. Jurors became close as they did their work. Going home was tough. They had to go through tunnels and past SWAT teams. I imagine it must have seemed surreal.

“It was the haunted house of SWAT,” one juror said. This is not something they prepare one for in school. Some of the jurors were overcome as it dawned on them just how serious this case was.

“I was like, Holy, Moly.”

“We knew it was big.”

Some jurors were moved to tears. Some were permanently changed. Ruby Freeman. That jewel of a woman was one witness that was deeply compelling to them. Tricia Raffensperger, wife of Brad, Georgia’s secretary of state, reportedly became emotional when describing the hate — the threats and the viciousness directed at her by Maga.

“I just know things that are hard to know” one juror said. When it was all over, they quietly left much the same way they had come in — quietly and unobtrusively, as observers of an incredible series of events.

Several jurors said they were “honored” to have been part of it. They took it seriously. This group of people will never forget this. They will always remember it and hopefully take pride in the fact that they were and are, truth-seekers that are now part of history — very important history.

And I suspect many of them saw the tragedy, the sadness of country divided. And they, more than almost anyone, know the truth: “I tell my wife, if every person in America knew every single word of information we knew, this country would not be divided as it is right now.”

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