Brett Kavanaugh caught tampering with witnesses in Deborah Ramirez accusation

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Even as Deborah Ramirez was coming forward to accuse Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, Kavanaugh and his team tried to coordinate with the witnesses involved, according to a stunning new report from NBC News. Kavanaugh’s scheme backfired when one of his old acquaintances – who happens to be an attorney – got dragged into it and decided to come forward. Remarkably, there are text messages which substantiate what was going on.

As the New Yorker was assembling its story which detailed Ramirez’s accusations, Brett Kavanaugh began reaching out to his old friends and asking them to come to his defense. It’s not illegal to ask people to publicly defend you from an allegation made in a magazine article. But because Kavanaugh was being accused of a felony, and because he was in the process of being investigated as a nominee by the Senate, he had a reasonable expectation that this could turn into a law enforcement investigation.

Accordingly, Palmer Report has spoken with a legal expert who has confirmed that this represents witness tampering on Brett Kavanaugh’s part. You don’t have to look any further than the Paul Manafort case for confirmation that improperly contacting witnesses constitutes witness tampering whether or not you specifically ask the witnesses to lie on your behalf.


Of course this may end up being less about the criminal implications of Brett Kavanaugh’s witness tampering, and more about the fact that he did it at all – thus further disqualifying him from being worthy for the Supreme Court. Read the startling NBC News expose here.

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