Score one for Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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It is hard to believe that nearly three years have passed since Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died, on September 18, 2020, within weeks of the presidential election. We are also approaching the one-year mark since the U.S. Postal Service announced Ginsburg will be the subject of a “Forever” stamp. Fortunately, the Postal Service—which is still “led” by Louis DeJoy—announced that the long-awaited stamp is almost here.

The Postal Service just issued a new statement that it will unveil the Ginsburg stamp at a first day-of-issue ceremony at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. on October 2. Calling Ginsburg a “lifelong trailblazer,” the Postal Service pointed out that she excelled as a law professor, discrimination expert, and fearless judge while being a woman in a field long dominated by men.

The event, which will be free and open to the public, is aimed at “celebrating her groundbreaking contributions to justice, gender equality and the rule of law.” So, if you live in or plan to visit D.C. on that day, you can RSVP now to show your support for Ginsburg and her legacy.

Earlier this week, Ginsburg received another rare, posthumous honor. On Monday, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul announced a portrait carving of Ginsburg on the State Capitol’s Great Western Staircase. Ginsburg joins the ranks of six other women featured in the staircase gallery, alongside other pioneers such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan B. Anthony, and Clara Barton.

Ginsburg is the first person to be added to the Great Western Staircase since it was completed in 1898, and the location of her likeness has particular significance. The second floor was chosen so that Ginsburg’s portrait sits in an area where only men’s portraits had been included. In addition, her likeness appears just above that of first-ever Chief Justice John Jay, making Ginsburg only the second Supreme Court justice to be honored in this way.

All this comes as the U.S. Navy continues work on a new ship that, as it announced last year, will honor Ginsburg as “a historic figure” who was “instrumental to why we now have women of all backgrounds, experiences and talents serving within our ranks.” The USNS Ruth Bader Ginsburg will join the fleet of the John Lewis-class of replenishment oilers named for civil and human rights icons. Three years after her untimely death, Justice Ginsburg is beginning to get the recognition she is due—and may it serve as an inspiration for all future justices.

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