Donald Trump and the GOP have this entirely wrong

On March 30 1981, the most closely guarded man in the world, President Ronald Reagan was the intended target of an assassin. The phalanx of security that surrounded him was impressive and well armed. Highly trained Secret Service, and uniformed District of Columbia Police were tasked with guarding the President. The armed professionals that day were bested by a disturbed individual, betting on fame that would be his ticket for the affections of a film actress Jody Foster. A poor aim, luck and a fast as light speed trip to the hospital saved President Reagan that day.

After events in Parkland, all the usual suspects, the NRA, Donald Trump, the Republican hierarchy, and the guns at all costs true believers are back; “we need more guns in schools! We can train and arm teachers to save students and Make America Great Again!”. Would that it were that simple.

Where are the teachers found that can effectively secure students in an active shooter situation and go into full Rambo mode to dispatch evil that is willing to take as many souls as possible? Where is the NRA’s champion good guy teacher with a gun? How much collateral damage will be caused by a close quarters gunfight in a classroom?

To turn teachers in to Militia men, willing to take a bullet, such creations are a fantasy of the NRA and now it seems to be the Great White Hope of the politically deluded. No amount of MAGA enthusiasm can be successful in Close Quarters Combat. For if evil is on a quest, no amount of armed encircling security can prevent a trigger pulling finger. Didn’t help Ronald Reagan and it won’t help a teacher and the students under siege with split seconds to decide what to do.

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Christin Palmedo

Christin Palmedo is a transgendered woman and retired Navy/Coast Guard Vet living in Maine after a lifetime of hurried living.