Rudy Giuliani’s voting machine scandal just got even uglier

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One of the stories that was barely in the news cycle for a day was the fact that during the 2020 election, Donald Trump ordered the military to seize voting machines in a desperate hope to cling to power. In part, this was due to the Joe Rogan/Spotify controversy that emerged almost immediately after and forced artists and listeners to take sides.

While the latter was less important, it’s still largely in the news because it involves a service that a number of Americans are active subscribers of – even if it’s much less consequential in the long run. This led a few of the social media doomcasters to cry about how it meant the former guy would once again get away with it all – even though the plan didn’t come to fruition – and now, thanks to another bombshell in the scandal, there’s a good chance that it won’t be getting swept under the rug either.

It’s not just Trump that was involved in what appears to be an alarming, authoritarian power grab either. It turns out that Rudy Giuliani contacted the prosecutor of Antrim County, Michigan, and asked him to seize the county’s voting machines just a few weeks after the 2020 election, despite the prosecutor’s office having no probable cause to do so.

   

It’s not quite clear what the intent of Giuliani’s team was here – but if nothing else, it would give the appearance of voting irregularities to support Donald Trump’s claims. It also suggests that the Trump campaign was prepared to seize power by any means necessary in the event of a loss.

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