Here’s how to really make gun control happen

Americans represent 4% of the world’s population but hold 42% of the registered firearms as compared to other nations whose gun controls laws are harsher. For argument’s sake, let’s assume that registered firearms refer to law enforcement and registered owners. Firearms obtained illegally, and from foreign providers would be in addition.

What does this mean to you? More guns make for a better country? A healthier population? Or simply a longer life? What do you want? More controls for obtaining a firearm do not hurt your 2nd Amendment rights. Nor do longer waiting periods to qualify, higher age limits for those applying for multiple firearms or simply disallowing certain firearms to go to private users.

They merely ensure protection for those around us. “Providing more guns to teachers or others is like saying that a pill will cure my cancer?” And that is not true.

The bulk of the American people want to live a long healthy life with their loved ones. To achieve this means more people must become involved in their communities; identify where the breakdowns occur; fix these breakdowns; deal with the reports to police tip lines that are not acted upon; draft a list of new safety measures; metal detectors on school entries, badges for school members, etc. Determine the cost to implement the chosen ones, obtain funding and implement them.

Local police must be engaged with their communities; health care must be communicating with police and sharing information; friends and families have to be working together. Implement solutions that ensure a long and healthy life for all. Data analytics must be used and read by someone who understands the data.

Where to start and who will coordinate this for you? Each community needs a leader who is able to work with experts in the area. A person who has earned the trust of the local police, who is able to visit schools and community centers to ensure that they are hearing the message. Support this person and give them the resources they need. This is not a political issue but a human one. Working towards a safer world is one way to reduce murder rates and ultimately health care costs.

Diane S. Baker is a veteran of the insurance industry; 35 years as a broker and agency owner; Risk Manager for the past 10 years; member of RIMS Society in NY, fluent in 3 languages and lives in Vancouver B.C.

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